Category Archives: Programming languages

Talking Trojan: Analyzing an Industry-Wide Disclosure

Talking Trojan: Analyzing an Industry-Wide Disclosure tells the story of what happened after we discovered the Trojan Source vulnerability, which broke almost all computer languages, and the Bad Characters vulnerability, which broke almost all large NLP tools. This provided a unique opportunity to measure software maintenance in action. Who patched quickly, reluctantly, or not at all? Who paid bug bounties, and who dodged liability? What parts of the disclosure ecosystem work well, which are limping along, and which are broken?

Security papers typically describe a vulnerability but say little about how it was disclosed and patched. And while disclosing one vulnerability to a single vendor can be hard enough, modern supply chains multiply the number of affected parties leading to an exponential increase in the complexity of the disclosure. One vendor will want an in-house web form, another will use an outsourced bug bounty platform, still others will prefer emails, and *nix OS maintainers will use a very particular PGP mailing list. Governments sort-of want to assist with disclosures but prefer to use yet another platform. Many open-source projects lack an embargoed disclosure process, but it is often in the interest of commercial operating system maintainers to write embargoed patches – if you can get hold of the right people.

A vulnerability that affected many different products at the same time and in similar ways gave us a unique chance to observe the finite-impulse response of this whole complex system. Our observations reveal a number of weaknesses, such as a potentially dangerous misalignment of incentives between commercially sponsored bug bounty programs and multi-vendor coordinated disclosure platforms. We suggest tangible changes that could strengthen coordinated disclosure globally.

We also hope to inspire other researchers to publish the mechanics of individual disclosures, so that we can continue to measure and improve the critical ecosystem on which we rely as our main defense against growing supply chain threats. In the meantime, our paper can be found here, and will appear in SCORED ‘22 this November.

The Dynamics of Industry-wide Disclosure

Last year, we disclosed two related vulnerabilities that broke a wide range of systems. In our Bad Characters paper, we showed how to use Unicode tricks – such as homoglyphs and bidi characters – to mislead NLP systems. Our Trojan Source paper showed how similar tricks could be used to make source code look one way to a human reviewer, and another way to a compiler, opening up a wide range of supply-chain attacks on critical software. Prior to publication, we disclosed our findings to four suppliers of large NLP systems, and nineteen suppliers of software development tools. So how did industry respond?

We were invited to give the keynote talk this year at LangSec, and the video is now available. In it we describe not just the Bad Characters and Trojan Source vulnerabilities, but the large natural experiment created by their disclosure. The Trojan Source vulnerability affected most compilers, interpreters, code editors and code repositories; this enabled us to compare responses by firms versus nonprofits and by firms that managed their own response versus those who outsourced it. The interaction between bug bounty programs, government disclosure assistance, peer review and press coverage was interesting. Most of the affected development teams took action, though some required a bit of prodding.

The response by the NLP maintainers was much less enthusiastic. By the time we gave this talk, only Google had done anything – though we now hear that Microsoft is now also working on a fix. The reasons for this responsibility gap need to be understood better. They may include differences in culture between C coders and data scientists; the greater costs and delays in the build-test-deploy cycle for large ML models; and the relative lack of press interest in attacks on ML systems. If many of our critical systems start to include ML components that are less maintainable, will the ML end up being the weakest link?

Morello chip on board

Formal CHERI: rigorous engineering and design-time proof of full-scale architecture security properties

Memory safety bugs continue to be a major source of security vulnerabilities, with their root causes ingrained in the industry:

  • the C and C++ systems programming languages that do not enforce memory protection, and the huge legacy codebase written in them that we depend on;
  • the legacy design choices of hardware that provides only coarse-grain protection mechanisms, based on virtual memory; and
  • test-and-debug development methods, in which only a tiny fraction of all possible execution paths can be checked, leaving ample unexplored corners for exploitable bugs.

Over the last twelve years, the CHERI project has been working on addressing the first two of these problems by extending conventional hardware Instruction-Set Architectures (ISAs) with new architectural features to enable fine-grained memory protection and highly scalable software compartmentalisation, prototyped first as CHERI-MIPS and CHERI-RISC-V architecture designs and FPGA implementations, with an extensive software stack ported to run above them.

The academic experimental results are very promising, but achieving widespread adoption of CHERI needs an industry-scale evaluation of a high-performance silicon processor implementation and software stack. To that end, Arm have developed Morello, a CHERI-enabled prototype architecture (extending Armv8.2-A), processor (adapting the high-performance Neoverse N1 design), system-on-chip (SoC), and development board, within the UKRI Digital Security by Design (DSbD) Programme (see our earlier blog post on Morello). Morello is now being evaluated in a range of academic and industry projects.

Morello desktopMorello chip on board

However, how do we ensure that such a new architecture actually provides the security guarantees it aims to provide? This is crucial: any security flaw in the architecture will be present in any conforming hardware implementation, quite likely impossible to fix or work around after deployment.

In this blog post, we describe how we used rigorous engineering methods to provide high assurance of key security properties of CHERI architectures, with machine-checked mathematical proof, as well as to complement and support traditional design and development workflows, e.g. by automatically generating test suites. This is addressing the third problem, showing that, by judicious use of rigorous semantics at design time, we can do much better than test-and-debug development.
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Arm releases experimental CHERI-enabled Morello board as part of £187M UKRI Digital Security by Design programme

Professor Robert N. M. Watson (Cambridge), Professor Simon W. Moore (Cambridge), Professor Peter Sewell (Cambridge), Dr Jonathan Woodruff (Cambridge), Brooks Davis (SRI), and Dr Peter G. Neumann (SRI)

After over a decade of research creating the CHERI protection model, hardware, software, and formal models and proofs, developed over three DARPA research programmes, we are at a truly exciting moment. Today, Arm announced first availability of its experimental CHERI-enabled Morello processor, System-on-Chip, and development board – an industrial quality and industrial scale demonstrator of CHERI merged into a high-performance processor design. Not only does Morello fully incorporate the features described in our CHERI ISAv8 specification to provide fine-grained memory protection and scalable software compartmentalisation, but it also implements an Instruction-Set Architecture (ISA) with formally verified security properties. The Arm Morello Program is supported by the £187M UKRI Digital Security by Design (DSbD) research programme, a UK government and industry-funded effort to transition CHERI towards mainstream use.

Continue reading Arm releases experimental CHERI-enabled Morello board as part of £187M UKRI Digital Security by Design programme

Trojan Source: Invisible Vulnerabilities

Today we are releasing Trojan Source: Invisible Vulnerabilities, a paper describing cool new tricks for crafting targeted vulnerabilities that are invisible to human code reviewers.

Until now, an adversary wanting to smuggle a vulnerability into software could try inserting an unobtrusive bug in an obscure piece of code. Critical open-source projects such as operating systems depend on human review of all new code to detect malicious contributions by volunteers. So how might wicked code evade human eyes?

We have discovered ways of manipulating the encoding of source code files so that human viewers and compilers see different logic. One particularly pernicious method uses Unicode directionality override characters to display code as an anagram of its true logic. We’ve verified that this attack works against C, C++, C#, JavaScript, Java, Rust, Go, and Python, and suspect that it will work against most other modern languages.

This potentially devastating attack is tracked as CVE-2021-42574, while a related attack that uses homoglyphs – visually similar characters – is tracked as CVE-2021-42694. This work has been under embargo for a 99-day period, giving time for a major coordinated disclosure effort in which many compilers, interpreters, code editors, and repositories have implemented defenses.

This attack was inspired by our recent work on Imperceptible Perturbations, where we use directionality overrides, homoglyphs, and other Unicode features to break the text-based machine learning systems used for toxic content filtering, machine translation, and many other NLP tasks.

More information about the Trojan Source attack can be found at trojansource.codes, and proofs of concept can also be found on GitHub. The full paper can be found here.

UKRI Digital Security by Design: A £190M research programme around Arm’s Morello – an experimental ARMv8-A CPU, SoC, and board with CHERI support

PIs: Robert N. M. Watson (Cambridge), Simon W. Moore (Cambridge), Peter Sewell (Cambridge), and Peter G. Neumann (SRI)

Since 2010, SRI International and the University of Cambridge, supported by DARPA, have been developing CHERI: a capability-system extension to RISC Instruction-Set Architectures (ISAs) supporting fine-grained memory protection and scalable compartmentalization .. while retaining incremental deployability within current C and C++ software stacks. This ten-year research project has involved hardware-software-semantic co-design: FPGA prototyping, compiler development, operating-system development, and application adaptation, as well as formal modeling and proof. Extensively documented in technical reports and research papers, we have iterated on CHERI as we evaluated and improved microarchitectural overheads, performance, software compatibility, and security.

As we know, mainstream computer systems are still chronically insecure. One of the main reasons for this is that conventional hardware architectures and C/C++ language abstractions, dating back to the 1970s, provide only coarse-grained memory protection. Without memory safety, many coding errors turn into exploitable security vulnerabilities. In our ASPLOS 2019 paper on CheriABI (best paper award), we demonstrated that a complete UNIX userspace and application suite could be protected by strong memory safety with minimal source-code disruption and acceptable performance overheads. Scalable software compartmentalization offers mitigation for future unknown classes of vulnerabilities by enabling greater use of design patterns such as software sandboxing. Our An Introduction to CHERI technical report introduces our approach including the architecture, microarchitectural contributions, formal models, software protection model, and practical software adaptation. The CHERI ISA v7 specification is the authoritative reference to the architecture, including both the architecture-neutral protection model and its concrete mappings into the 64-bit MIPS and 32/64-bit RISC-V ISAs. Our Rigorous Engineering technical report describes our modelling and mechanised proof of key security properties.

Today, we are very excited to be able to talk about another long-running aspect of our DARPA-supported work: A collaboration since 2014 with engineers at Arm to create an experimental adaptation of CHERI to the ARMv8-A architecture. This widely used ISA is the foundation for the vast majority of mobile phones and tablets, including those running iOS and Android. The £170M UKRI program Digital Security by Design (DSbD) was announced in late September 2019 to explore potential applications of CHERI — with a £70M investment by UKRI, and a further £117M from industry including involvement by Arm, Microsoft, and Google. Today, UKRI and Arm announced that the Arm Morello board will become available from 2021: Morello is a prototype 7nm high-end multi-core superscalar ARMv8-A processor (based on Arm’s Neoverse N1), SoC, and board implementing experimental CHERI extensions. As part of this effort, the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) has also announced a new £8M programme to fund UK academics to work with Morello. Arm will release their Morello adaptation of our CHERI Clang/LLVM toolchain, and we will release a full adaptation of our open-source CHERI reference software stack to Morello (including our CheriBSD operating system and application suite) as foundations for research and prototyping on Morello. Watch the DSbD workshop videos from Robert Watson (Cambridge), Richard Grisenthwaite (Arm), and Manuel Costa (Microsoft) on CHERI and Morello, which are linked below, for more information.

This is an incredible opportunity to validate the CHERI approach, with accompanying systems software and formal verification, through an industrial scale and industrial quality hardware design, and to broaden the research community around CHERI to explore its potential impact. You can read the announcements about Morello here:

Recordings of several talks on CHERI and Morello are now available from the ISCF Digital Security by Design Challenge Collaborators’ Workshop (26 September 2019), including:

  • Robert Watson (Cambridge)’s talk on CHERI, and on our transition collaboration with Arm (video) (slides)
  • Richard Grisenthwaite (Arm)’s talk on the Morello board and CHERI transition (video) (slides)
  • Manuel Costa (Microsoft)’s talk on memory safety and potential opportunities arising with CHERI and Morello (video)

In addition, we are maintaining a CHERI DSbD web page with background information on CHERI, announcements regarding Morello, links to DSbD funding calls, and information regarding software artefacts, formal models, and so on. We will continue to update that page as the programme proceeds.

This has been possible through the contributions of the many members of the CHERI research team over the last ten years, including: Hesham Almatary, Jonathan Anderson, John Baldwin, Hadrien Barrel, Thomas Bauereiss, Ruslan Bukin, David Chisnall, James Clarke, Nirav Dave, Brooks Davis, Lawrence Esswood, Nathaniel W. Filardo, Khilan Gudka, Brett Gutstein, Alexandre Joannou, Robert Kovacsics, Ben Laurie, A. Theo Markettos, J. Edward Maste, Marno van der Maas, Alfredo Mazzinghi, Alan Mujumdar, Prashanth Mundkur, Steven J. Murdoch, Edward Napierala, Kyndylan Nienhuis, Robert Norton-Wright, Philip Paeps, Lucian Paul-Trifu, Alex Richardson, Michael Roe, Colin Rothwell, Peter Rugg, Hassen Saidi, Stacey Son, Domagoj Stolfa, Andrew Turner, Munraj Vadera, Jonathan Woodruff, Hongyan Xia, and Bjoern A. Zeeb.

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This work was supported by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), under contract FA8750-10-C-0237 (CTSRD), with additional support from FA8750-11-C-0249 (MRC2), HR0011-18-C-0016 (ECATS), and FA8650-18-C-7809 (CIFV) as part of the DARPA CRASH, MRC, and SSITH research programs. The views, opinions, and/or findings contained in this report are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as representing the official views or policies of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government. We also acknowledge the EPSRC REMS Programme Grant (EP/K008528/1), the ERC ELVER Advanced Grant (789108), the Isaac Newton Trust, the UK Higher Education Innovation Fund (HEIF), Thales E-Security, Microsoft Research Cambridge, Arm Limited, Google, Google DeepMind, HP Enterprise, and the Gates Cambridge Trust.

Euro S&P

I am at the IEEE Euro Security and Privacy Conference in London.

The keynote talk was by Sunny Consolvo, who runs Google’s security and privacy UX team, and her topic was user-facing threats to privacy and security. Her first theme was browser warnings, which try to stop users doing what they want to; it’s an interruption, it’s technical and there’s no obvious way forward other than clicking through the warning. In 2013 their SSL warning had a clickthrough rate of 68% while their more explicit and graphic malware warning had only 23% clickthrough. Mozilla’s SSL warning had a much lower 33%, with an icon of a policeman and more explicit tests. After four years of experimenting with watching eyes, corporate styling / branding and extra steps – none of which worked very well – they tried a strategy of clear instruction, attractive preferred choice, and unattractive alternative. The text had less jargon, a low reading level, brevity, specifics, an illustration and colour. Her CHI15 paper shows that the new design did much better, from 69% CTR to 41%. It turns out that many factors are at play; a strong signal is site quality, but this leads many people to continue anyway to sites they have come to trust. The malware clickthrough rate is now down to 5%, and SSL to 21%. That cost five years of a huge team effort, with back-end stuff too as well as UX. It involved huge internal fights, such as with a product manager who wanted the warning to say “this site contains malware” rather than “the site you’re trying to get to contains malware” as it was shorter. Her recent papers are here, here, and here.

A second thread of work is a longitudonal survey of public opinion on privacy ranging from government surveillance to cyber-bullying. This has run since 2015 in sixteen countries. 84% of respondents thought limiting access to online but not public data is very or extremely important. 84% were concerned about hackers vs 55% worried about governments and 53% companies. 20% of Germans are very angry about government access to personal data versus 10% of Brits. Most people believe national security justifies data access (except in South Korea) while no country’s people believes the government should have access to police non-violent crime. Most people everywhere support targeted monitoring but nowhere is there majority support for bulk surveillance. In Germany 53% believed everyone should have the right to send anonymous encrypted email while in the UK it’s 39%. Germans were pessimistic about technology with only 4% believing it was possible to be completely anonymous online. Over 88% believe that freedom of expression is very or extremely important and less than 1% unimportant; but over 70% didn’t believe that cyberbullying should be allowed. Opinions are more varied on extremist religious content, with 10.9% agreeing it should be allowed and 21% saying “it depends”.

Her third thread was intimate partner abuse, which has been experienced by 27% of women and 11% of men. There are typically three phases: a physical control phase where the abuser has access to the survivor’s device and may install malware, or even destroy devices; an escape phase which is high-risk as they try to find a new home, a job and so on; and a life-apart phase when they might want to shield location, email address and phone numbers to escape harassment, and may have lifelong concerns. Risks are greater for poorer people who may not be able to just buy a new phone. Sunny gave some case stories of extreme mate guarding and survivors’ strategies such as using a neighbour’s phone or a computer in a library or at work. It takes seven escape attempts on average to get to life apart. After escape, a survivor may have to restrict childrens’ online activities and sever mutual relationships; letting your child post anything can leak the school location and lead to the abuser turning up. She may have to change career as it can be impossible to work as a self-employed professional if she can no longer advertise. The takeaway is that designers should focus on usability during times of high stress and high risk; they should allow users to have multiple accounts; they should design things so that someone reviewing your history should not be able to tell you deleted anything; they should push 2-factor authentication, unusual activity notifications, and incognito mode. They should also think about how a survivor can capture evidence for use in divorce and custody cases while minimising the trauma. Finally she suggests serious research on other abuse survivors of different age groups and in different countries. For more see her paper here.

I will try to liveblog the rest of the talks in followups to this post.

What you get is what you C

We have a new paper on compiler security appearing this morning at EuroS&P.

Up till now, writers of crypto and security software not only have to fight the bad guys. We also have to deal with compiler writers, who every so often dream up some new optimisation routine which spots the padding instructions that we put in to make our crypto algorithms run in constant time, or the tricks that we use to ensure that sensitive data will be zeroised when a function returns. All of a sudden some critical code is optimised away, your code is insecure, and you scramble to figure out how to outwit the compiler once more.

So while you’re fighting the enemy in front, the compiler writer is a subversive fifth column in your rear.

It’s time that our toolsmiths were our allies rather than our enemies. We have therefore worked out what’s needed for a software writer to tell a compiler that a loop really must be executed in constant time, or that a variable really must be set to zero when a function returns. Languages like C have no way of expressing programmer intent, so we do this by means of code annotations.

Doing it properly turns out to be surprisingly tricky, but we now have a working proof of concept in the form of plugins for LLVM. For more details, and links to the code, see the web page of Laurent Simon, the lead author; the talk slides are here. This is the first technical contribution in our research programme on sustainable security.

CHERI: Architectural support for the scalable implementation of the principle of least privilege

[CHERI tablet photo]
FPGA-based CHERI prototype tablet — a 64-bit RISC processor that boots CheriBSD, a CHERI-enhanced version of the FreeBSD operating system.
Only slightly overdue, this post is about our recent IEEE Security and Privacy 2015 paper, CHERI: A Hybrid Capability-System Architecture for Scalable Software Compartmentalization. We’ve previously written about how our CHERI processor blends a conventional RISC ISA and processor pipeline design with a capability-system model to provide fine-grained memory protection within virtual address spaces (ISCA 2014, ASPLOS 2015). In our this new paper, we explore how CHERI’s capability-system features can be used to implement fine-grained and scalable application compartmentalisation: many (many) sandboxes within a single UNIX process — a far more efficient and programmer-friendly target for secure software than current architectures.

Continue reading CHERI: Architectural support for the scalable implementation of the principle of least privilege