The Dynamics of Industry-wide Disclosure

Last year, we disclosed two related vulnerabilities that broke a wide range of systems. In our Bad Characters paper, we showed how to use Unicode tricks – such as homoglyphs and bidi characters – to mislead NLP systems. Our Trojan Source paper showed how similar tricks could be used to make source code look one way to a human reviewer, and another way to a compiler, opening up a wide range of supply-chain attacks on critical software. Prior to publication, we disclosed our findings to four suppliers of large NLP systems, and nineteen suppliers of software development tools. So how did industry respond?

We were invited to give the keynote talk this year at LangSec, and the video is now available. In it we describe not just the Bad Characters and Trojan Source vulnerabilities, but the large natural experiment created by their disclosure. The Trojan Source vulnerability affected most compilers, interpreters, code editors and code repositories; this enabled us to compare responses by firms versus nonprofits and by firms that managed their own response versus those who outsourced it. The interaction between bug bounty programs, government disclosure assistance, peer review and press coverage was interesting. Most of the affected development teams took action, though some required a bit of prodding.

The response by the NLP maintainers was much less enthusiastic. By the time we gave this talk, only Google had done anything – though we now hear that Microsoft is now also working on a fix. The reasons for this responsibility gap need to be understood better. They may include differences in culture between C coders and data scientists; the greater costs and delays in the build-test-deploy cycle for large ML models; and the relative lack of press interest in attacks on ML systems. If many of our critical systems start to include ML components that are less maintainable, will the ML end up being the weakest link?

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