Monthly Archives: March 2015

Security Protocols 2015

I’m at the 23rd Security Protocols Workshop, whose theme this year is is information security in fiction and in fact. Engineering is often inspired by fiction, and vice versa; what might we learn from this?

I will try to liveblog the talks in followups to this post.

Whodunnit? Fascinating Forensics by BBC’s Naked Scientists

BBC’s Naked Scientists recently did an hour-long show with live audience about forensic science,  during which they solved a (fictitious) murder with the help of six forensic scientists and practitioners.

Chris Smith and Ginny Smith covered the forensic process from crime scene to court room and discussed all the evidence in between, including how to retrieve forensic evidence from a crime scene, digital forensics and the (lack of) randomness of numbers, toxicology, pathology, eye-witness testimony and our work on motion-based lie detection.

You can find the podcast here.

Decepticon: International Conference on Deceptive Behavior

Call for papers

We are proud to present DECEPTICON 2015 – International Conference on Deceptive Behavior, to be held 24-26 August 2015 at the University of Cambridge, UK. Decepticon brings together researchers, practitioners, and like-minded individuals with a taste for interdisciplinary science in the detection and prevention of deception.

We are organising two panel sessions; one on Future Directions in Lie Detection Research with Aldert Vrij, Par-Anders Granhag, Steven Porter and Timothy Levine, and one on Technology Assisted Lie Detection with Jeff Hancock, Judee Burgoon, Bruno Verschuere and Giorgio Ganis. We broadly and warmly welcome people with varying scientific backgrounds. To cover the diversity of approaches to deception research, our scientific committee members are experts in fields from psychology to computer science, and from philosophy to behavioral economics. For example, scientific committee members from the University of Cambridge are Ross Anderson, Nicholas Humphrey, Peter Robinson and Sophie Van Der Zee.

We strongly encourage practitioners, academics and students alike to submit abstracts that touch on the topic of deception. The extended deadline for abstract submissions (max. 300 words) for an oral, panel or poster presentation is 8 APRIL 2015. Interested in attending, but don’t feel like presenting? You can register for the conference here.

Please visit our webpage for more information. We are happy to answer any questions!

We hope to see you in Cambridge,